It’s an exciting time to be working in marketing and analytics…

But what does the future hold? Lucky for us, our Data Solutions Lead – Tom Nichols has shared his predictions for the first year of this new decade below.

“A/B/n & MVT testing will dominate the VR space”

For years now, companies at every stage of digital & data maturity have been utilising split testing to help shape customer experience. These tests range from simple changes such as call to action button colour/wording changes to slightly more complex journey pathing optimisations and full scale machine learning based continuous testing & optimisation strategies. Ultimately, these tests can still only influence the website itself. There’s a plethora of variables that simply cannot be accounted for, and whilst these tests are still a great tool to determine the best direction for your UX strategy – they have a way to go before they provide deeper insights. These tests can usually confirm or deny a hypothesis, but not necessarily provide supporting insights on to why that hypothesis was or wasn’t correct. This can leave you  guessing at the real insights that could be carried over to the next test.

In the world of VR, developers can define the entire user experience. Emotional impactors such as the weather or atmospheric noise can be tailored to invoke a preferential state of mind for the experience in question.

With VR, users are less likely to be distracted by an external influence such as a phone notification, other browser tab, or a television in the background mid session.  Thus minimising the risk of breaking their focus and pulling their attention away from your carefully curated experience.

With eye tracking in VR, there’s no doubt about what catches a users attention, and how long for. Sort users with banner blindness from users without for a more accurate representation of how your content is interpreted. Learn what sort of stimuli pull attention away from your content, and adjust the environment to reduce that chance.

For the self-professed, anti-advertisement segment – (who balk at awareness campaigns or in-game advertising), even fictional adverts for fictional companies will still provide value when testing colours, fonts, voices, positioning in relation to other artefacts and so on. These are the insights that offer long term value, which can be applied to any campaign moving forward. It is these core influencing factors that will leave a lasting impression on your target audience.

“An increase in Machine First Analytics Configurations over Human first.”

Insight & Analysis tools such as Google Analytics are highly configurable, and every implementation is different to best suit the end users, i.e. the humans who need to make decisions off of the data. Events, goals, and methods of definition and measurement fluctuate even within a single organisation, with individual highly specific interactions captured in ways that make reporting easier.  However, this can often occur at the cost of a more complete view of the experience. Knowing what to focus on and why is a key requirement for any analyst, but by leaving what you may consider unimportant interactions untracked, you lose the ability to factor them into the equation altogether. This allows for biases and preconceptions to shape the reports you utilise reactively in decision making, instead of proactively finding new insights – not very data driven.

As data schema & data warehouse architectures advance, visualisation opportunities improve, and machine learning algorithms surface newfound patterns – it will only be a matter of time before basing analytics implementations around data point acquisition takes precedence over usability. Much of this data won’t be formatted in meaningful ways to human eyes, but it doesn’t need to be. Another computational layer sits between your data and the human analysing it.  Those wanting to keep up with the bleeding edge of digital maturity will have to accept that their data ingestion strategies will no longer be tailored around their ability to interpret or understand them. Let’s leave that to the machines and reap the benefits at a later stage of the process.

“Healthcare will take centre stage in the privacy debate.”

Data Privacy is getting hotter and hotter a topic year on year. We are generally less willing to give away information about ourselves for free, and consider our identity as more of a commodity than ever before. Our data can be used to help or harm us. It seems that for every one marketer looking to personalise our experience, that there are two marketers looking to use that same data to take decision making out of our hands and into theirs for their own personal gain.

Collaboration is vital to our success in everything we do. In a perfect world, sharing our data benefits everybody and harms nobody as we use it to better understand ourselves, our thought processes, and our world. But the misuse of our data has left a growing majority cold to the idea of participating. If this trend continues, we will lose our ability to learn and grow at the pace required to drive meaningful change. By closing ourselves off, our problems aren’t obvious to those who might be able to help, and our understanding of things can only take into account the limited view of what’s presented to us, not reality as a whole.

Early detection of health issues depends on our data. Modern research is far more able to correlate more factors to increased risk of health problems.  By knowing where you live, how you commute to work, what you eat, your biometric information, or what you google –  we can build a tapestry of whether you are more likely to be on course for, or in the early stages of a serious health condition.

We’re right to be wary of our digital identity and who has access to what parts of it. Privacy is important. But unless the big players can convince us once again to give up a little more of ourselves soon, they run the risk of losing us altogether. Health and well-being are a priority for almost everyone. With advances in technology continuing to improve, it’s an ideal topic on which to sway public opinion back in the favour of select data collaboration, rather than opting out altogether. 

Get in touch to find out how we can help modernise your marketing by booking a consultation with our CEO Chris Rozic here. 

6 months ago,

We consulted our analytics oracles at Datisan for their 2019 Data & Analytics Predictions. Today we’re checking back in to see how accurate they were!

“Data and Technology will break Marketing Silos” – Chris Rozic, CEO

Broader use of Machine Learning (ML) and better management of customer data will mean that rather than siloing the customers, marketers can use this data to experiment and have an overall aggregated understanding of their customer data across the whole business. This in turn will deliver better, more personalised CX and drive brand success.

THE VERDICT:
Chris’s crystal ball was working back in January. We’ve definitely seen broader use of machine learning to deliver better customer experiences across the board in the past 6 months. This year both Amazon and Google have released and are currently working on recommendations engines as services. And as of last week Google has released open source machine learning models for marketing use cases (see here).

“Martech connectivity is King” –  Anrich Brummer, Senior Data Analyst

In 2019 connectivity between tools in the marketing stack will become key; all the way from web analytics, to livechat systems, CRMs, ad platforms, and marketing data warehouses (e.g. Bigquery)/ Marketers want self-service analytics dashboards and are moving away from tools that don’t talk to each other anymore, or analytics & ad platforms that don’t share a cookie space / can’t identify a user consistently.

THE VERDICT:
Anrich was on the money with this prediction, which has certainly proven true so far in 2019. Enterprises continue to seek out tools that better communicate with one another as well as the best platforms to achieve and enable integrated marketing outcomes.

“The Emergence of VR and AR Analytics” – Matt Daniels, CTO

Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) will mature as platforms for marketing. Through the use of mobile devices like smartphones as well as VR headsets and glasses, content and traditional advertising platforms (like billboards) will become interactive. Metrics like eye tracking, head tracking, gaze-through, VR engagement, session time and earned media mean that we will be able to track the data and analyse its performance.

THE VERDICT:
Matt may have been a little ahead of the game on this one. While it looks as though eye and body motion tracking is on the increase, we haven’t yet seen the full force of these metrics being used for marketing and advertising just yet. (But keep an eye out!)

“The Rise of Data Ethics and Privacy” – Matt Forman, Founder

It’s no secret that currently the bad actors of data privacy are being exposed, and will continue to be next year. Customers are aware of their right to privacy, especially when it comes to their data collection and its usage. The recent ACCC investigation into digital platforms has resulted in recommendations for change to be finalised next year (an Aussie GDPR* anyone?). The installation of a regulatory committee and changes to the privacy act are on the cards and are pretty clear indicators are going to be big topics of conversation in the coming 12 months.

(*General Data Protection Regulation – standardised data protection and privacy law for all individuals within the European Union and the European Economic Area.)

THE VERDICT:
Matt F was right – privacy and data ethics have well and truly dominated the tech news headlines over the past 6 months. The most notable being Facebook’s recent announcements for stronger end-to-end encryption across their Facebook, WhatsApp, Messenger and Instagram products. Google too has changed gears, focusing in on privacy as their core design principle whereby if a product cannot provide a solution in a privacy complicit way, then the product or feature will not be built. (More on this in our Google Marketing Live recap here.)

Get in touch to find out how we can help modernise your marketing by booking a consultation with our CEO Chris Rozic here. 

It’s that time of year…

when we start to look back and reflect on the past 12 months, and wonder what next year will hold.. which is why we consulted our analytics oracles at Datisan for their 2019 Data & Analytics Predictions!

“Data and Technology will break Marketing Silos” – Chris Rozic, CEO

Broader use of Machine Learning (ML) and better management of customer data will mean that rather than siloing the customers, marketers can use this data to experiment and have an overall aggregated understanding of their customer data across the whole business. This in turn will deliver better, more personalised CX and drive brand success.

“Martech connectivity is King” –  Anrich Brummer, Senior Data Analyst

In 2019 connectivity between tools in the marketing stack will become key; all the way from web analytics, to livechat systems, CRMs, ad platforms, and marketing data warehouses (e.g. Bigquery)/ Marketers want self-service analytics dashboards and are moving away from tools that don’t talk to each other anymore, or analytics & ad platforms that don’t share a cookie space / can’t identify a user consistently.

“The Emergence of VR and AR Analytics” – Matt Daniels, CTO

Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) will mature as platforms for marketing. Through the use of mobile devices like smartphones as well as VR headsets and glasses, content and traditional advertising platforms (like billboards) will become interactive. Metrics like eye tracking, head tracking, gaze-through, VR engagement, session time and earned media mean that we will be able to track the data and analyse its performance.

“The Rise of Data Ethics and Privacy” – Matt Forman, Founder

It’s no secret that currently the bad actors of data privacy are being exposed, and will continue to be next year. Customers are aware of their right to privacy, especially when it comes to their data collection and its usage. The recent ACCC investigation into digital platforms has resulted in recommendations for change to be finalised next year (an Aussie GDPR* anyone?). The installation of a regulatory committee and changes to the privacy act are on the cards and are pretty clear indicators are going to be big topics of conversation in the coming 12 months.

(*General Data Protection Regulation – standardized data protection and privacy law for all individuals within the European Union and the European Economic Area.)

Get in touch to find out how we can help transform your business in 2019 by by booking a consultation with our CEO Chris Rozic here. 

In our weekly team meeting…

We were each asked to take a few minutes to do an exercise and ask ourselves a couple of questions about what it is that we actually do at Datisan.

The first was to propose a common pain point for our customers:

You know when..?

IT and marketing sometimes don’t see eye to eye? Especially when it comes to gaining access to first party data to allow it to be connected to marketing data?

The second question (and corresponding answer) we’ll come back to at the end, but this first question got us to thinking about the gap that lies between marketing and IT. Is it just about data access? Is it about a lapse in communication? Or about different focuses for different teams?

The answer is all of the above.

Infographic-Marketing-IT

 

It’s fair to say that while traditional marketing didn’t rely as heavily on technology, that this has completely shifted. The digital marketplace has demanded that every business be a ‘tech company’, and in relation to marketing, that their processes become digitised to deliver more personalised, seamless journeys for consumers. Customer experience improvements, driving client growth and increasing customer loyalty through behavioural targeting are all expectations of marketing teams which are heavily (if not completely) dependent on tech. This is why marketing is so reliant on the support of their IT department.

According to the Harvard Business Review the majority of IT professionals believe that mining big data for business intelligence as well as digital audience expansion, geo-tagging and tracking of customers already plays a huge role in marketing and that this is only set to increase. But IT are also a department in their own right, with their own objectives to achieve and delivery requirements.

A 2014 Accenture survey of over 1,100 Senior Marketing Executives and Senior IT Executives showed that 69% of CMOs recognized the need to align with IT (56% in 2012) vs. 83% of CIOs (77% in 2012).

– While these figures had clearly improved over the 2 years that the survey was conducted (and you’d hope it has continued to increase since), we’re clearly still coming unstuck somewhere.

So what’s the issue? Well for starters marketing and IT aren’t communicating. They’re speaking different languages and have completely different objectives. IT are focused on internal architecture, security and governance and marketing are focused on leveraging the latest technologies to deliver better customer experiences.

Again from our favourite 2014 Accenture report:

Marketing –  “My IT team does not understand the urgency with which I need to integrate new sources of data to address market conditions”

IT – “Marketing don’t properly understand the technology and their requirements and priorities change too often for us to keep up. ”

Sound familiar? 

The second issue is that often the infrastructure isn’t set in place to manage all of  the data that marketing requires access to, to automate and personalise their  customer experiences. Huge amounts of data from multiple sources need to be  collected, integrated and harvested to produce these insights, and quickly.

So how are these problems being addressed? More and more we’re seeing the emergence of cross over roles like Chief Digital Officers who are cutting through marketing and IT silos and becoming a bridge for delivering integrated solutions. Whether a company sees the necessity for the new role or not, one thing is clear, that CIOs and CMOs should be better communicating and collaborating between teams, especially when it comes to customer focused digital transformation. They should also understand and appreciate one another’s internal deliverables, particularly for IT who still have to work on the internal intellectual property of the company as well as supporting and building internal apps.

On the infrastructure front there needs to be integration of technology, data and marketing services. Next-generation external marketing services and running the platform in the cloud, allow marketing and IT to provide better customer experiences, responding quickly to new customer requirements and adding new services if necessary.

Back to our Monday morning meeting where we were asked to see how we fit into all of this:
“So what we do to solve this problem?”

Well what we do is…

Help businesses to bring all of their data together in cloud native data warehouses by being able to talk marketing with IT and IT with marketing. We help you to make sense and activate the data to improve on your customer experiences.

So really, we’re killing a couple of birds with one stone. We’re helping IT and marketing to speak the same language and develop roadmaps that have everyone on the same page with aligned objectives and strategies.

Whether those strategies include hybrid cloud (on-premise + cloud) or full cloud migrations for marketing workloads, we’ll help to consolidate your data, giving better, more timely and efficient insights.

Get in touch to find out how we can help bridge the gap for your marketing and IT with Cloud for Marketing, and see how it can transform your business. Get in touch by booking for a consultation with our CEO Chris Rozic, here.